About fostering

Fostering is looking after a child or young person who can’t live with their own family. There are a number of reasons they might not be able to live with their family and it can be a very difficult time for the child so they’ll needs lots of support and care.

Foster carers come from all walks of life and you can find out more about our foster carers here.

We particularly need to recruit foster carers for certain groups of children including:

  • Brothers and sisters
  • Older children and young people
  • Children from black and ethnic minority backgrounds
  • Children that will be in foster care long term
  • Children who need more specialist care

Types of fostering

 

Short term & Long Term:

Short term fostering can range from an overnight stay up to two years. Carers provide a safe and secure place to live while we try to reunite the child with their family or find a permanent family. The age range can be from babies and infants up to teenagers.                          

Long term fostering provides young people who can't live with their birth families on a permanent basis a planned placement where they can grow up in a safe and secure environment, often over a number of years. Many children are still in contact with their birth families so a key responsibility for all long term carers is supporting this contact.         

 

Emergency:

Some children have to be moved in an emergency, often in unsociable hours. Emergency foster carers are there for children for a brief period of time until short term carers are available or until the child is able to return to their birth family.                        

You’ll need to be able to provide a safe space in an emergency with little notice and be willing to look after children of different ages and needs. 

 

Respite / Short Breaks:

Respite care is providing short term care to give regular carers a break. This can include fostering of different ages and various needs and you'll be paid for the time you care for the child.       

 

Parent & Child:

This involves helping a parent, usually young themselves, to be a good parent and care for their child. A foster carers input helps decide whether the parent should be allowed to continue caring for their child or by somebody else.       

This involves looking after children who have autism, learning disabilities, physical impairments and health needs. We would also really like to hear from people who could accommodate a child in a wheelchair. You would need to be willing to have adaptations made to your home if necessary.                        

Children with disabilities:

This involves looking after children who have autism, learning disabilities, physical impairments and health needs. We would also really like to hear from people who could accommodate a child in a wheelchair. You would need to be willing to have adaptations made to your home if necessary.